Friday, November 30, 2012

Collossal Rifts in The Systems of Morality

              
"A system of morality which is based on relative emotional values is a mere illusion, a thoroughly vulgar conception which has nothing sound in it and nothing true."

-Socrates

"Truly it is evil to be full of faults; but it is still a greater evil to be full of them and unwilling to recognize them, since that is to add the further fault of a voluntary illusion."

-Blaise Pascal



Paul A. Graber
This past October, an Amish man man from Kentucky, Paul A. Graber was found guilty of defrauding a financial institution.  Graber wrote checks against closed bank accounts.  According to a man who worked for a collection agency and was familiar with the case, the checks were written for large amounts ranging from $11,000 to $60,000. Graber was sentenced to 4 years in prison for "defraud of a financial institution."  For more of the details on this court case see here.  

By now, many people know that the Federal Reserve prints their debt notes out of thin air.  The printers have insulated themselves with their phony laws and continue to squeeze the world of its resources while seriously harming millions of people.  Nobody high up in the banking or political structure has lost power let alone face charges for defrauding the American people and purposefully stealing from them.  The entire system of fiat money is immoral and destructive.

Here is what Graber had to say to the courtroom on the day of his sentencing:  "If we’re all wrong, what is right? If everyone’s just going through the motions of issuing opinions what is right? Where do we draw the line of being wrong and having opinions.  Everyone in this trial did everything wrong and now you want to take away my freedom. What’s the court’s penalty for doing things wrong?"

The court's penalty for "doing things wrong" is nothing.  If people are waiting for the court declare themselves "full of shit," it is just not going to happen.  When the presiding administrator was asked about Graber's steep sentence of four years in prison, the judge lamented that if Graber had only met with the probation board he would have gotten a lesser sentence.  Graber, in meeting with the probation board, would have admitted by acknowledging their authority that he had done something wrong.  Since the Federal Reserve prints nothing of value, what did he do wrong?   

Obama and Corzine are buddies

There is nothing the court hates more than hearing that their phony legal game is a sham.  Disrepect of their authority is enough to unleash their fury.  It is such a shame such miscarriages of justice are allowed to keep happening, especially in light of the enormous economic crimes committed by friends of the U.S. President and others.   

States of War

Are government forces engaged in a perpetual state of war against people in America?

The Interesting Case of Plenty Horses

In 1891, an Indian brave named Plenty Horses shot and killed Lieutenant William W. Casey on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.  Plenty Horses had returned from attending a white assimilation school in the East for five years and felt shunned by his own people when he returned to the Indian camp.  By shooting the Lieutenant, Plenty Horses hoped the tribe would welcome him back because he felt he was between two cultures and not really part of either.


Plenty Horses after capture
After the killing of Casey, Plenty Horses was arrested for murder.  Working pro bono for Plenty Horses, lawyers George Nock and David Powers argued that a state of war existed between the United States and the Lakota peoples and therefore belligerents could not be tried for murder in this case.  If the prosecution alleged that a state of war did not exist between the Dakota peoples, they would have to justify the slaughter of over 150 Indians at Wounded Knee just days prior to Casey's death.

As presiding administrative judge George Shiras, Jr put it, "If they were not (U.S. and Lakota engaged in a state of war) it would be hard to justify the killings of the Indians at Wounded Knee and other places."    

Yes, it would.  Plenty Horses was freed and the soldiers that committed the atrocities at Wounded Knee were also cleared of charges. 

  

No comments: